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Operating Systems Home Inspection from A to Z - DVD Flash Videos

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Operating Systems Home Inspection from A to Z - DVD Videos. Real Estate Home Inspection, Appraisal, Energy Saving Home Improvements.-Operating Systems Home Inspection from A to Z - DVD Videos. Real Estate Home Inspection, Appraisal, Energy Saving Home Improvements.

 

Well Water System

Well Water System photos: P 57-P 64, P 230

The main components of a well water system consist of a well pump, the water lines, the pressure gauge and the water storage tank. The basic operation of a well system is as follows:

  1. The well pump sends water up from the well through the water lines. The water builds up in the water storage tank. When the tank pressure gauge reaches its high setting, the pressure switch turns the well pump off. Water then sits in the water storage tank, similar to a water heater tank.

  2. When a faucet is turned on, the water is drawn from the storage tank only, and not the well. The water pressure in the storage tank begins to drop as the water continues to run from the faucet. When the pressure gauge drops a few psi, it switches on the well pump to replenish the water supply in the water storage tank. This is needed to keep the tank near full capacity or to keep up with the water being drawn from the faucets.

  3. The purpose of the water storage tank is to hold enough water so the well pump doesn't have to turn on every time someone turns on a faucet. If the storage tank is faulty or isn't large enough, then the well pump will turn on just about every time someone turns on a faucet. This is called short cycling and will lead to premature failure of the well pump because it's operating too often.

There are three types of well pumps: suction pumps, jet pumps, and submersible pumps. The type of well pump installed will be based upon the depth of the well.

  • Suction pumps are only used for very shallow wells that are 25 feet deep or less. A suction pump is installed next to the well water storage tank. These pumps only have one water pipe in the well shaft. A vacuum must be maintained in the pipes for the pump to lift the water from the well. Suction pumps are inefficient because a perfect vacuum in the well pipes can only lift water about 25 feet. If there are any leaks or debris in the pipe, the vacuum pressure is reduced. As a result, the water cannot be lifted as high. Suction pumps have a life expectancy of about 15 years.

  • Jet pumps can be used for wells that are 120 feet deep or less. Like a suction pump, a jet pump is installed next to the well water storage tank. These pumps have two water pipes in the well shaft. One pipe is the larger suction line. The other pipe forces water down the well to push more water back up the suction pipe. About 5 gallons of water are pumped down the well and 8 gallons of water are pushed up the larger suction pipe. This provides an overall 3 gallons of water per minute and isn't efficient. Jet pumps use much more energy because they push water down the well, while trying to lift more water out of the well shaft. Moreover, as with suction pumps, jet pumps cannot have any leaks or debris in the pipes. This would cut down the efficiency even further by fouling the vacuum needed for this system. Jet pumps are generally more expensive to repair. Jet pumps have a life expectancy of about 15 years.

  • Submersible pumps can be used for the deepest wells. Unlike the other pipes, submersible pumps are installed completely inside the well shaft. As a result, you won't see any well pump parts during your inspection. Since the pump parts are not in the house, submersibles are the quietest type of pumps. Submersible pumps are the most efficient types to use. They have a life expectancy of about 10 years.

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