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U.S. laws on visiting Cuba Travel by U.S. citizens to Cuba is governed by "¢ the Trading With the Enemy Act "¢ the Cuban Liberty and Democratic Solidarity Act and "¢ the Cuban Assets Control Regulations Violations of these laws or regulations are investigated and prosecuted by the Office of Foreign Assets Control, Department of the Treasury. You can report violations to their Cuba Sanctions Violation Hotline 305-810-5170. Here is a synopsis of the pertinent laws. No boat can go from U.S. to Cuba Unless otherwise authorized, no vessel carrying goods or passengers to or from Cuba or carrying goods in which Cuba or a Cuban national has any interest may enter a U.S. port. The prohibition also applies to vessels which enter only to take on fuel and supplies (bunker)"¦ Penalties Criminal penalties for violating the sanctions range up to 10 years in prison, $1,000,000 in corporate fines, and $250,000 in individual fines. Civil penalties up to $55,000 per violation may also be imposed. Please note that the Regulations require those dealing with Cuba to maintain records and, upon request from the U.S. Treasury Department, to furnish information regarding such dealings. Travel to Cuba Only persons whose travel falls into the categories discussed below may be authorized to spend money

related to travel to, from, or within Cuba. Persons licensed to engage in travel-related transactions in Cuba may spend up to the State Department Travel Per Diem Allowance for Havana, Cuba for purchases directly related to travel in Cuba, such as hotel accommodations, meals, local transportation, and goods personally used by the traveler in Cuba (travelers can check the current per diem rate on the Internet at <<https://www.state.gov/m/a/als/prdm/>>). Most licensed travelers may also spend additional money for transactions directly related to the activities for which they received their license. For example, journalists traveling in Cuba under the journalism general license (described below) may spend money over and above the current per diem for extensive local transportation, the hiring of cable layers, and other costs that are directly related to covering a story in Cuba. Licensed travelers may also spend an additional $100 on the purchase of Cuban merchandise to be brought back with them to the United States as accompanied baggage, but this $100 authorization may be used only once in any 6-month period. Purchases of services unrelated to travel or a licensed activity, such as non-emergency medical services, are prohibited. The purchase of publications and other informational materials is not restricted. Who can travel to Cuba Generally, you need specific permission from the U.S. government to visit Cuba. If you violate the law, you can be fined up to $250,000 or imprisoned for up to 10 years or both. OFAC can also levy civil penalties of up to $55,000 per violation. The following travelers are authorized, under OFAC general license, to engage in travel transactions while in Cuba: "¢ Journalists and supporting broadcasting or technical personnel (regularly employed in that capacity by a news reporting organization and traveling for journalistic activities). "¢ Official government travelers (traveling on official business). "¢ Members of international organizations of which the United States is also a member (traveling on official business). "¢ Persons traveling once a year to visit Cuban nationals who are close relatives (additional trips within one year will need an OFAC specific license). "¢ Travelers who have received specific licenses from OFAC prior to going. "¢ Full-time professionals whose travel transactions are directly related to professional research in their professional areas, provided that their research: (1) is of a noncommercial academic nature, (2) comprises a full work schedule in Cuba, and (3) has a substantial likelihood of public dissemination. "¢ Full-time professionals whose travel transactions are directly related to attendance at professional meetings or conferences in Cuba organized by an international professional organization, institution, or association that regularly sponsors such meetings or conferences in other countries. The organization, institution, or association sponsoring the meeting or conference may not be headquartered in the United States unless it has been specifically licensed to sponsor the meeting. The purpose of the meeting or conference cannot be the promotion of tourism in Cuba or other commercial activities involving Cuba, or to foster production of any biotechnological products. "¢ Amateur or semi-professional athletes or teams traveling to participate in Cuba in an athletic competition held under the auspicesof the relevant international sports federation. The athletes must have been selected for the competition by the relevant U.S. sports federation, and the competition must be one that is open for attendance, and in relevant situations participation, by the Cuban public. Unauthorized travel-related transactions: Unless otherwise authorized, any person subject to U.S. jurisdiction who engages in any travel related transaction in Cuba violates the Regulations. VESSELS - All persons on board vessels, including the owner, must be authorized travelers, as listed above, to engage in travel-related transactions in Cuba. If you are not an authorized traveler, you may not purchase meals, pay for transportation, lodging, dockage or mooring fees, cruising fees, visas, entry or exit fees and you may not bring any Cuban origin goods back to the United States. John T. Reed John T. Reed on real-estate-investment information Copyright 2004 by John T. Reed, a.k.a. John Reed, Jack Reed, 342 Bryan Drive, Alamo, CA 94507, Voice: 925-820-7262, Fax: 925-820-1259, www.johntreed.com

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