­

Psychologist' report on pedestrian Russ Whitney hit This is a deposition taken under oath from a psychologist. I am leaving out the psychologist' name. If you must see it, get the records from Schenectady County. 1. Your deponent is a psychologist duly licensed by the State of New York, and maintains an office at _____Albany, New York. 2. Your deponent conducted psychological evaluations of the plaintiff Bob Deering [not his real name] on 8/6/82 and 9/3/82. 3. The evaluations were conducted for the purposes of: following up a prior psychological evaluation of the plaintiff; determining whether the plaintiff was capable of competitive employment; and to determine whether there were means for the plaintiff to compensate himself for his damage. 4. The evaluations were conducted at the request of _______, a vocational rehabilitation counselor with the New York State Education Department. 5. The specific tests administered by your deponent were: (a) The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale. This test generally is an IQ test. It is a test which indicates the present level of intellectual functioning. (b) The Wechsler Memory Scale"”Form I. This test is a measure of the person' memory. (c) Hooper Visual organization Test. This test is a measure of a person' ability to organize visual component parts into a whole. (d) Booklet Category Test. This test measures the person' ability for conceptual and abstract thinking. (e) Halstead-Reitan Neuropsychological Tests. This series of tests measure the amount of brain function or

dysfunction. From the results of this series of tests, one can derive inferences in regards to whether brain damage is diffuse or focal (where brain is located), whether it is accute or chronic, and whether the damage is progressive or stable. 6. The plaintiff' performance on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence test places him in the lowest limits of the borderline range. The borderline range is an I.Q. range of 70-79, which places the plaintiff in the lowest 8.7% of the general population, when comparing I.Q.'. 7. The plaintiff' ability to attend and for immediate recall, and to process arithmetic concepts, was in the lowest average limits, when compared to the general population. 8. The plaintiff' visual-spatial performance and his ability to see cause/effect relationships in specific, concrete, situations were also in the lowest average limits, when compared to the general population. 9. The plainitff' results on the Hooper Visual Organization Test placed him in the impaired range,, and from such results, brain damage may be inferred. 10. All of the plaintiff' other test scores were within the mentally retarded range. 11. There is ample evidence that the plaintiff has suffered cognitive impairment from his accident. 12. The plaintiff exhibits psychomotor retardation, and his thinking is concrete, which means that the plaintiff has very limited ability to form abstract thoughts. 13. The plaintiff exhibits a loss in his social comprehension, and in his communication skills. 14. The results of the Halstead-Reitan Test Battery indicate the existence of moderate brain damage which is diffuse, i.e., the damage is not limited to a small number of particular locations in the brain. 15. Said brain damage is now stable. No improvement in the plaintiff' brain damage is expected throughout his life. 16. The plaintiff' brain damage interferes with all areas of the plaintiff' functioning; his ability to learn new concepts and to deal with novel information; his eye/hand coordination; his finger dexterity; and his ability to correctly perceive and organize new material. 17. Based upon my findings, I do not believe the plaintiff could successfully work in a competitive work situation. 18. The plaintiff' brain damage is stable and diffuse. 2/83 John T. Reed, a.k.a. John Reed, Jack Reed, 342 Bryan Drive, Alamo, CA 94507, Voice: 925-820-7262, Fax: 925-820-1259, www.johntreed.com

Log in to comment
­