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Selected responses to John T. Reed' analysis of Rich Dad Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki 1 Kiyosaki analysis I put the emails opposing me in red and those supporting me in green. They give you a flavor of the type of person who makes Kiyosaki a best-selling author compared to the kind who buy my books. John T. Reed Thanks for your page. I would love to doubt what you said, but too much had a ring of truth to it. Some of the general advice was probably good for someone like me, but I can see how it hurts in the long run. I only wish I had seen your page first. I probably could have saved myself a lot of money. Sincerely, Tom Knighton Dear Mr. Reed: I've just spent a considerable amount of time reading the special section of your web site on Robert Kiyosaki. As a 1986 USMMA graduate, I was dismayed to learn that you weren't getting much support from the student/alumni community regarding the validation of Mr. Kiyosaki's claims about his military academy history and subsequent military service/real estate/business/writing career. Although I never read Rich Dad, Poor Dad, I did buy and read The Rich Dad's Guide to Real Estate Investing (that might not be the exact title but I think you'll recognize which book it is). I really can't remember much about the book - it only took a couple of hours to get through - except the concept of having experts to look out for your interests (attorneys, tax advisors and the like). In fact, maybe Kiyosaki didn't even write the book - now I'm remembering something about a woman whose last name is Kennedy - one of Kiyosaki's experts. Anyway, I also remember that I didn't subscribe to some of the techniques described to profit from real estate. Everyone is different in their property goals. Mine just happens to be a buy and hold style, so I wasn't particularly interested in the flipping strategies described in one or more of the chapters. Back to the subject of the USMMA, I am happy to say that attending and graduating from Kings Point is the best thing I've ever done to enhance my chances of being successful in business and in life. The motto of the school is "Acta, Non Verba" or "Action, Not Words." Subsequently, I've earned an MBA and am directing both of my children to get a great education. I can't stand the fact that after graduating from Kings Point, Mr. Kiyosaki espouses the belief that a person doesn't need an education to be wealthy. That's an indirect hit to the Academy. In any event, feel free to use my name. I'd also be curious to know the 1986 graduate's name that you quoted on your site ("A 1986 Merchant Marine Academy graduate tells me that about half of the students there were rejected by Annapolis or another major service academy. He said the other half wanted careers on oceangoing ships."). It seems to me that a lot of people don't know about the USMMA as a Federal military academy option, and I have no means of validating that classmate's statement. The fair majority of midshipman I remember were local to the NY-PA-NJ area and competed furiously for spots at USMMA. My pride is probably getting in the way at this point because I hate to think of USMMA as a second or third choice after one of the other academies. The school has a different mission and a different chain of command (DOT vs. DOD in peace time) than USNA, USAFA and USMA. I enjoyed your site and could go into my experiences with the Marshall Reddick Network and property managers but I wanted to stick to one subject per e-mail. Thanks for the education on Mr. Kiyosaki. I had no idea. Gayle McCutchan (graduated from USMMA as Gayle Hatfield, Class of 1986) Dear Mr. Reed: I would like to request that if you post this anywhere, please do not use my name. I was first given a copy of Rich Dad, Poor Dad by my father in law who had received it from his ex-girlfriend. Since this book was coming from a man that is quite comfortable in his finances, I took it seriously. After reading the book, I quit a job where I was making a decent salary as an engineer and then proceeded to waste the next two years of my life. Since Kiyosaki says that it is so easy to run a business and make money, I figured that I would be rich in no time. Unfortunately, after losing more than $30K trying to start up my easy income, I've gotten nowhere. What I can't believe is how there are people out there that call this a good book. There is nothing good about it. It is propaganda for a mass majority that is desperately trying to cling to something. People that are trying to blame everybody else for their problems. People that want to

understand why they have nothing, yet fail to see that the Mercedes Benz is not helping them at all. Kiyosaki is full of crap, he oversimplifies things and says absolutely nothing. Too bad I figured this out too late. My only salvation is that I'm still in my twenties and have plenty of time to make up for the money that I lost. Thankfully, I've recently found a job in my old line of work at about the same salary as before. This guy is dangerous; because of his stupid advice, I actually lost two years of income, lost an extra $30K, and almost got divorced. Name withheld by request "Greetings Mr. Reed, I found your website and read the analysis you have posted on Robert Kiyosaki. I had just recently got the book, read the first few chapters, and was a bit bothered by the 'homesiness' and silliness of the child-told stories that supposedly led this man to where he is today. I have to tell you that I was prodded to buy this book by a very good friend who does nothing but rant and carry on about what a genius this guy is. What I found in reading the first 60 or 70 pages is that your assertions in the analysis are correct - the guy is either the luckiest man around with stellar timing, or things aren't quite what he claims. But the main reason for writing is to tell you about a fool I know. This fool received an email telling about an hour long telephone conference call that anyone could attend for a $28 fee, and Robert Kiyosaki and David Novac (https://www.davidnovac.com) would be discussing upcoming stock market opportunities, what to avoid, the dangers of certain other investments over the next year, and a variety of other things that people would greatly benefit from. That conference call was, I believe, this past Tuesday at 7pm mountain time. So the fool (me) paid the $28, received an email with the 800 number and passcode on it for the call, and rushed home. I fired up Word to take notes, put my headset phone on, and dialed in. What followed was nothing more than a 'sales meeting' a la Amway style, where Kiyosaki and Novac shamelessly promoted their books and tapes on investing. Now, don't get me wrong. I agree with their assertion that there are far too many people who jump into the market without knowing what they're doing. And education is paramount to avoid just making your contribution to the people who know how to play the game, and then running away with your tail between your legs. But what isn't right is to promote the call as being heavy on information that everyone can use to make informed decisions, and then sell them things. It's amazing ... I feel like I paid $28 to attend an Amway/Quixtar meeting. Essentially, I was lied to, as was every other person played for a chump who was on that call. He should be prosecuted for false advertising. But it was a lesson learned and I will never trust him again. Just thought I'd pass it along. You have my permission to use my letter and name to warn others, and please email me if you have any questions or you would like a copy of my Word notes from the 'conference' call. Be Blessed, David Ruthstrom (rooth-strum), Elizabeth, Colorado "I just finished reading https://www.johntreed.com/Kiyosaki.html. I have one word for you: Bravo!" Robert Brooks "You deserve credit and thanks for debunking Mr. Kiyosaki. Unlike you, I did not read the entire Rich Dad Poor Dad book. But I have a son and was attracted to the concept of empowering my son with usable advice. It is this attraction, this vulnerability, more than anything else that makes me wish to extend thanks to you for countering Mr. Kiyosaki's exploitation. It is a really low blow to exploit a father's love for his children to sell garbage books. In the public library I read maybe thirty pages, deliberately chosen, of Rich Dad Poor Dad, and was disappointed to learn that it was rather insubstantial, if not contradictory or confusing. I was hoping for something different, perhaps a distinctly concrete, fact based comparison of two social groups with revealing insights. Or perhaps a parable showing with evidence how common misconceptions about personal money management have social roots, or something." Sean Arthur "I belive in getting all sides of the story. While you had some very valid points in your article RK also has some in his books. I never quite finished your whole article but read much of it (it was very long). After sitting back and thinking about it this is what I have decided. You wasted a whole bunch of time attacking someone else when you could have been doing something constructive with that time. I also think you have some serious hate and jealousy issues. If you think their is nothing to be learned from RK's books I will have to consider you a fool. no offense." respectfully yours, cody anger "Thank you, thank you, thank you for all the effort you have invested in your Kiyosaki web page. I certainly agree that you put much more effort into researching your web page than Kiyosaki put into researching his book. My son, like the surgeon's son, had decided that he could get rich by getting involved with a MLM scheme instead of pursuing his education. The MLM person even gave him a copy of "Rich Dad, Poor Dad." My initial uninformed impression of Kiyosaki was positive, that the book was a lot like "The Millionaire Next Door." But when I went to Kiyosaki's web page, I was shocked by the anti-education message. The way he denigrates his well-educated true father is appalling. It is also a gross violation of the 4th Commandment. I told my son, "I'll take the Poor Dad any day. If I had to choose, I'd rather be poor, honest and well-educated. Much better that than an unethical rich schemer." Then to find out from your website that "Rich Dad" is a fiction! The uneasiness I felt at Kiyosaki's web site was confirmed by your outstanding research. You analyzed, explained, investigated and demonstrated all the fraud behind Kiyosaki that I could only sense, but couldn't articulate properly to my son. You have performed a wonderful service. And I hope that you have saved my son from making a disastrous decision that could have sidetracked his life for many years. He was so thoroughly brainwashed by this MLM "cult" that he was resistant to hearing the truth. But when I kept reading point after point from your web page, as you proved again and again that Kiyosaki is a fraud, I believe that it finally got through to him. Then he fell back on, "Well who cares about Kiyosaki. The MLM scheme is still a good idea." But I replied, "Look, they are giving you anecdotal stories in place of real data. They will never tell you the average income of the MLM participants because it's probably negative after subtracting the entrance fee. So the hold up these "success stories" of individuals who became fabulously rich. But it turns out that these anecdotal stories are frauds. The whole concept is a fraud." I especially appreciate the way you analyzed the psychopathic aspects of Kiyosaki. Worse than the wasted time and money is the transformation of character that occurs. These MLM schemes teach you to be a rotten person -- focused entirely on greed and instructed by "motivational" tapes to ignore the feelings and even the outright protests of your friends and family as you try to suck them into your "system." You have performed a wonderful public service. Please accept my grateful congratulations on a job well done and my best wishes for your continued success." Sincerely, John Galvin What I have to conclude after reading key parts of [Kiyosaki'] 1993 book [If You Want to be Rich & Happy, Don’t Go To School] is that it is just impossible to tell what is real and what is imagined in Kiyosaki' autobiographical saga, now spread over several books. Is Kiyosaki a pathological liar, or delusional, or both, or is there some other explanation? I can’t say. I am convinced, however, that the ‘Rich Dad’ figure who is so prominently featured in Rich Dad Poor Dad [but totally absent from ‘best teachers I ever had’ discussions in the earlier …Don’t Go To School book] must be a complete figment of Kiyosaki' imagination." Geoffrey L. Bryan "I Literally just tossed Dolf De Rooses "Real Estate Riches" in the dumpster. I plan to do the same with Kiyosaki's "Rich Dad Poor Dad" as soon as I can retrieve it from a (hopefully still) friend I loaned it to. Good Lord, it is amazing what ends up as "recommended reading." I am a 40 yr old working physicist and software developer who is admittedly ignorant about nearly everything except physics and software development! Hard work and some good fortune has dramatically increased my earnings of late and it is very clear to me that I must learn how to mange investments and taxes. A few hours browsing your website (combined with my own so recently repressed commo sense) has shown me that these guys are not the answer! I read every page of "Rich Dad Poor Dad" in two evenings believing that I had found some kind of insight into investing that with just a little more information..... The fact that this book is presented as non-fiction, supposedly relating actual events and the wisdom of a proven successful investor lead me to assume a dangerous level of credibility. My biggest concern was that there was not enough details or math or real specific numerical examples for me to understand the concepts (though I thought perhaps some of the other books would make it clear). Your analysis of "Rich Dad, Poor Dad" made much more immediate sense to me than the book itself did. As must so many other people (based on the "bestseller" label) I desperately want to believe there are easy answers to investing, yet I know that nothing worthwhile ever comes easy. I truly thank you for your website and your critical review of Kiyosaki. I will be far more skeptical of such material in the future regardless of how many bestseller lists and other associated hype it has piled on it." James Diederich "I just finished reading your scathing article on Kiyosaki. I was not prepared for the information it contained, I'll give you that! At the start of the article I was deeply offended because I had in a sense idolized Kiyosaki and made him a role model. Your foundation dynamiting article was more than enough to trigger an emotional response in me. But with the belief that more knowledge is almost always better, I decided to keep an open mind and hear you out. I was most shocked at the copyright notice that some stuff had been 'fictionalized'. I pulled open one of my Kiyosaki books (I have all four) and sure enough found that little sentence in all of them. I could understand him taking some liberties to recreate his conversations with Rich Dad, but fictionalizing them all together? If all he did was take some liberties it might be better to just state that and that they were recreated, not fictionalized. But I digress. After concluding your article, I must say that you have made me think seriously about what I have read in his books. I strongly agree he does not give how-to advice. In fact, I can't really think of any specific advice he gives other than to use your brain. And after reading his books I did not have any strong desire to finish college. I have already completed 2 years of college. Perhaps my lack of enthusiasm for college was brought about by Kiyosaki's disdain for the educational system. The contradictions were easy to pass over while I had Kiyosaki enshrined, but when you put them down in writing in your tables, I had no choice but to mentally acknowledge them and follow them through to their logical consequences. The entire way through my brain kept trying to rationalize and defend him, something I found quite odd. I was defending HIM, not his ideas, because I like HIM. That got me thinking about how successful he was as a salesman. I think he does have a killer personality that he conveys, and I have to humbly admit that I have been duped. As noted earlier I am a college student, but just recently have gotten very interested in real estate investment, and actually was planning to purchase my first property this fall. Perhaps I should hold off? A lot of my enthusiasm for getting started originates from Robert Allen and Kiyosaki. I haven't yet read your take on Allen, but I did see that he had some financial troubles on your guru page. Strangely enough, I came to your website through a recommended reading list on Kiyosaki's forums by another investor. I wonder if he just ordered your book and didn't bother to actually look at your site? Thank you for all this overwhelming at present information that totally shatters my idol status of Kiyosaki. I think I will be a smarter investor with the knowledge you've equipped me with, and I don't think I can ever read another Kiyosaki book the same way. Also, might it be possible to check for the existance of Rich Dad in various Hawaii news archives? I remember a specific passage in one of Kiyosaki's books that said no one knew who rich dad was until this 'quiet-spoken man' quietly began buying up large sections of waikiki and honolulu and was featured in all the papers." Aksel Arnesen "Hi John, Yesterday, I was looking for the website for Robert Kiyosaki's 'free report' that comes with each of his books. I've purchased most of his books. Each book has a website link to a free audio report. I was at work & wanted to download the audio commentary using my fast internet connection there, but I didn't have the link, so I did a web search for richdad & ran across your website. Ouch.!!! Your discussion of Kiyosaki's work came up first. I read through the first couple paragraphs, and felt my blood start to boil. I was angry, "How dare he say that about someone like Kiyosaki." I'm smart enough to be able to smell the scent of truth when its shoved in my face though, so I kept reading. Ouch. The truth hurts sometimes. I had bought everything Kiyosaki said hook line & sinker. I'm even involved in a group that gets together every other Monday to play his Cashflow 101 game. Thank you for writing what you wrote. Its saved me a lot of wasted time. I've bought several books on real estate investing. Its interesting. The ones that you don't recommend (Carleton Sheets (just his book - I wasn't stupid enough to buy his program), Kiyosaki, Dolf de Roos) left me feeling pumped up but lacking the knowledge I felt I would need to start investing. I have three others that I've purchased recently--each contains more useful information in one chapter than all of the Sheets, de Roos, & Kiyosaki books I've read combined. After reading all the fake gurus' books, I had decided to include real estate investing in my 5-year plan. I'm 27, have a lot of credit card debt that needs to be paid off, spending patterns to change, a savings account to build, a bit of maturing to do & some reading to finish before I consider getting into real estate. Maybe at a gut level, I didn't trust what I had read. I don't trust people who don't talk about the pitfalls of something. If I don't have a good list of the ways I can fail at something, I don't get into it. Thanks for opening my eyes. I will be doing more research as I get ready to start investing. I'm sure some of that research will include some of your books." Regards, Jon Lehman "HI, MY NAME IS CHRISTINE THORNTON AND I WANT TO SAY THAT I LOVED THE BOOK. I'M A 22 YEAR OLD COLLEGE STUDENT THAT IS MAJORING IN BUSINESS, I FEEL THAT EVERYTHING ROBERT TALKED ABOUT IN HIS BOOK WAS ALL I NEEDED TO KNOW. WORKING FOR MONEY SUCKS WHEN IT CAN WORK FOR YOU. I OWN TWO DUPLEX APARTMENTS IN MILWAUKEE, WI AND I DON'T PAY RENT, AND I DON'T WORK FOR MONEY AND THAT IS WHAT YOU CALL LIVING. THAT HOW LIFE SHOULD BE FOR ALL 22 YEAR OLD COLLEGE STUDENTS. I FEEL YOUR MAD BECAUSE HE'S LIVING ON MILLIONS$$$$$$$$$$$$ AND YOUR LIVING ON NADDA(NOTHING) SHIT ************ HA HA HA HA HA CHRISTINE THORNTON

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